Forbes Magazine Recognizes Jim Woods’ ETF Pick

O’Shares FTSE Asia Pacific Quality Dividend ETF is a way for investors to play the dividend market in the Asia-Pacific region. Here, O’Shares Chairman Kevin O’Leary visits the trading floor after ringing the New York Stock Exchange opening bell July 28, 2015. He was marking the recent launch of the O’Shares FTSE US Quality Dividend ETF is way of the renaissance man jim woods etf pick featured in forbes magazine
O’Shares FTSE Asia Pacific Quality Dividend ETF is a way for investors to play the dividend market in the Asia-Pacific region. Here, O’Shares Chairman Kevin O’Leary visits the trading floor after ringing the New York Stock Exchange opening bell July 28, 2015. He was marking the recent launch of the O’Shares FTSE US Quality Dividend ETF. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Excerpted from Forbes, originally published September 6, 2018

Way of the Renaissance Man Jim Woods was recognized by Forbes Magazine for one of his recent picks. Read what Jim had to say. From the article entitled,

“17 Funds For Contrarians Who Want Global Diversification”

Jim Woods, The Deep Woods

The O’Shares FTSE Europe Quality Dividend ETF offers a relatively low-risk, low-volatility way to invest in out-of-favor international markets. To be considered for inclusion in the portfolio, targeted issuers must exhibit three main attributes: high quality, low volatility and high dividend yields.

While the ETF seeks out companies with solid dividend yields, the additional emphasis on quality gives the ETF a kind of safety net. As such, this fund’s respectable 3.7% yield is built on solid ground. Its top three European allocations are the United Kingdom, 28.7%; Switzerland, 18.7%; and France, 16.2%.

Its top three sectors by allocation are Healthcare, 19%; Consumer Goods, 18.1%; and Industrials, 15.4%. Investors interested in receiving a monthly dividend distribution through a low-volatility international fund may want to look into the O’Shares FTSE Europe Quality Dividend ETF.

The O’Shares FTSE Asia Pacific Quality Dividend ETF is a refined yet simple way for investors to play the dividend market in the Asia-Pacific region. The ETF chooses its holdings from the FTSE Developed Asia Pac Index, which is composed of roughly 800 of the largest publicly-listed companies within the developed Asia-Pacific region.

It screens the candidates and selects those that meet certain thresholds for market cap, liquidity, high quality, low volatility and dividend yield. The ETF is 44.05% invested in Japan, 26.25% in Australia, 14.08% in Hong Kong, 8% in South Korea and 5% in Singapore. The ETF pays a distribution yield of 5.03% and charges an expense ratio of 0.48%.

 

MoneyShow — an industry pioneer in investor education since 1981 — is a global, financial media company, operating the world's leading investment and trading conferences…

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Crypto, Acapulco, and How to Ooze Passion Special Guest Jeff Berwick

Next on the Way of the Renaissance Man, Crypto, Acapulco, and How to Ooze Passion

Welcome to the Way the Renaissance Man podcast. This is a show about ideas, personal empowerment, and celebrating the rational life. Our goal is to help each other discover the tools needed to better focus our minds, integrate our thoughts with actions, and live the lives we really want with your host Jim Woods.

Who's On:

Today's Guest from our FreedomFest interviews is Jeff Berwick, Anarcho-Capitalist. Libertarian. Freedom fighter against mankind’s two biggest enemies, the State and the Central Banks. Jeff is the founder of The Dollar Vigilante and host of the popular video podcast, Anarchast. Jeff is a prominent speaker at many of the world’s freedom, investment and cryptocurrency conferences including his own, Anarchapulco, as well as regularly in the media including CNBC, Bloomberg and Fox Business. Jeff also posts exclusive content daily to the new blockchain based social media network, Steemit.

Jeff was the CEO from 1994 until 2002 when he sold the company. Afterwards, Berwick went forth to live on and travel the world by sailboat but sank his boat in a storm off the coast of El Salvador. After being saved clinging to his surfboard with nothing but a pair of surfing shorts left of all his material possessions he decided to “live nowhere” and travel the world as spontaneously as possible with one overarching goal: See and understand the world with his own eyes, not through the lens of the media.

A central theme in Jeff's life is to do everything with passion. Listen in as Jim and Jeff have a conversation about what's important in life and what drives Jeff everyday.

What's Discussed:

What drives a live well lived?

How do we apply passion?

Jeff's view of fiat currencies and what's next, crypto?

What is Anarchopulco?

What one can do to integrate and celebrate one's life with others.

Learn More with Links:

Jeff's Website:

dollarvigilante.com

anarchapulco.com

 

Jim's Website:

WayOfTheRenaissanceMan.com

JimWoodsInvesting.com

 

FreedomFest:

FreedomFest.com

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The MoneyShow San Francisco Debuts Inaugural Show – Mark Skousen Interviews Market Analyst Jim Woods

Award-winning investment newsletter writer Dr. Mark Skousen hosts MoneyShow TV's inaugural broadcast with Market Analyst, editor of Successful Investing,The Deep Woods, and Fast Money Alert, and top three stock picker Jim Woods.

Here we have an opportunity to catch a snippet of Jim's financial wisdom shared during today's broadcast. Mark Skousen and Jim discuss ETF's and the shrinking of publicly traded companies. They discuss what to pick and stay away from in this clip from the MoneyShow's Facebook Fan Page.

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Speaking With the Warrior in the Battle for Lower Taxes Grover Norquist

Welcome to the Way of the Renaissance Man podcast.

This is a show about ideas, personal empowerment, and celebrating the rational life. Our goal is to help each other discover the tools needed to better focus our minds, integrate our thoughts with actions, and live the lives we really want with your host Jim Woods.

Who's On:

Today's Guest from our FreedomFest Appearances is Grover Norquist, (Twitter: @GroverNorquist) is president of Americans for Tax Reform, a taxpayer advocacy group he founded in 1985 at President Reagan’s request. ATR works to limit the size and cost of government and opposes higher taxes at the federal, state, and local levels and supports tax reform that moves towards taxing consumed income one time at one rate.

ATR organizes the Taxpayer Protection Pledge, which asks all candidates for federal and state office to commit themselves in writing to the American people to oppose all net tax increases. In the 115th Congress, 212 House members and 45 Senators have taken the pledge.

What's Discussed:

  • The Formation of Americans for Tax Reform
  • What is the purpose of the organization
  • How they hold politicians accountable at every level of government
  • Accountability as a fundamental concept of the Way of the Renaissance Man
  • Grover's stand-up comedy pursuits
  • and A day in the life of Grover

Learn more with guest links:

Grover's Website: atr.org

Jim's Website: JimWoodsInvesting.com

FreedomFest: FreedomFest.com

 

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8 Keys to Cultivating a Renaissance Man Mindset

By Jim Woods

Life is man’s game.

More specifically, it’s game best played by a Renaissance Man.

Now by “man,” or “Renaissance Man,” I don’t mean to exclude females. In fact, I know plenty of females who are “manlier” and more Renaissance Man than their male counterparts. When I refer to “man” or “men” or “manliness,” I am referring to a way in which to approach and interact with the world.

I am using “man” and its derivations here as short-hand for a mindset, a way of life, a way of engaging with reality and a way of setting your own mark in the world… and enforcing that mark.

You see, life is tough.

Life will kick you in the ass and smack you down if you let it.

There’s a great lyric from the very-manly punk rocker Henry Rollins in his song “Blues Jam,” that I found very compelling when I heard it some 25 years ago. It goes like this…

Believe me when I tell you
Life will not break your heart
It’ll crush it…

As dark a sentiment as that is, the reality is that part of being a Renaissance Man is facing that heartbreak dead on, absorbing the blow… and then soldiering on in pursuit of your goals.

Indeed, it’s the cultivation of resilience, focus in the face of adversity, and laughing in the face of your enemies that makes a man a true Renaissance Man. And in doing so, a man is able to embrace his struggle, enjoy his wins, and most importantly, enjoy the one and only life he has to live.

So, I say… take on that life as a Renaissance Man!

But what does this mean? Well, here are a eight keys to cultivating a Renaissance Man mindset.

1) Let reason be your guiding light. Use your emotions as a tool to help you decide your course, but make sure emotions are always placed in the service of your rational faculty.

2) Work hard and make smart decisions. There’s no substitute for effort, and there’s no replacing intelligent, reasoned exertion. A Renaissance Man always works hard to determine the smartest course of action.

3) Be the kind of person you’d want to be around. That means be a good friend, a good spouse, a good father, a good boss, a good teacher and a good student—and especially be an aggressive participant in life.

4) Lead a moral existence. Be honest, and act in such a way that helps yourself, your loved ones, your community and the world become a better place.

5) Make a commitment to learn things. Read books, read articles and study subjects you’re interested in. Go to lectures, listen to podcasts like this one, and surround yourself with interesting people. Make learning a life-long commitment. Learning is one of the most-rewarding things a Renaissance Man can do.

6) Do things you aren’t good at. Struggle is often the key to growth. Don’t be afraid to learn new skills, or a new language, or a new sport, etc., even if those activities don’t come to you easily. Working through self-imposed struggle is good for a Renaissance Man. If you only do things you’re already good at, you’ll never grow.

7) Enjoy the doing. In Ayn Rand’s novel (the writer is definitely a “Renaissance Man” in the principled sense) The Fountainhead, protagonist Howard Roark says the following: “Before you can do things for people, you must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing…”. Be a man who loves the doing, and you’ll be a Renaissance Man who achieves.

8) Make smart money decisions. Don’t take on too much debt. Don’t buy more than you can afford. Don’t waste your money on get-rich quick schemes or shaky partnerships. Here, especially, it’s important to fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Don’t allow yourself to be a victim of bullshit. And finally, invest smart, and with patience and discipline.

It’s this final principle that gets the most attention in my investment newsletter advisory services, and if you check those services out at www.JimWoodsInvesting.com, you’ll learn all the specific ways in which I recommend investing to achieve your financial goals.

And while I employ a variety of tactics, strategies and techniques to help maximize profits and minimize losses, there are some basic rules of investing like a Renaissance Man that apply to every investor. Those rules aren’t hard to understand, although I admit they can sometimes be hard to follow.

In future articles, you’ll find out more details on investing strategies. However, first things first. Yet before you can invest like a Renaissance Man, you have to nurture the proper mindset. By applying these eight keys to cultivating a Renaissance Man mindset, you’ll be well on your way to doing just that!

In the name of the best within us,

Jim Woods

 

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Why the Rich Get Richer—and How You Can Too

By Jim Woods

Why the Rich Get Richer—and How You Can Too

A few years ago, building wealth in America was all about getting a good education, a good job, diligently saving money through your 401(k), and investing in real estate. That formula worked through the 1990s, and through most of the 2000s.

Then the housing market crashed, the banking and financial system nearly imploded, and the value of stock portfolios, including most retirement accounts, got slapped upside the head by a vicious bear. A foreclosed house with a red foreclosure stamp running along the top of the picture.

If you’re like most investors, you probably were counting on a consistent rise in your stock holdings to get you to the next level of wealth—and maybe into the echelons of the so-called rich. A big part of that plan also was likely the increased value of your home and/or other real estate holdings. Well, we all know what happened to real estate prices when the bubble burst, and that put many investors in a seemingly inescapable hole.

We also know that many investors threw their hands up in frustration and sold their equity holdings at the very bottom of the market in late-2008 and early 2009. To make matters worse, many have still stayed out of stocks since 2009, thereby missing out on one of the biggest bull markets in history.

Yet the meltdown in both the real estate and equity markets in 2007-2008, along with the pessimism about the future of the economy and the markets, were reflected in a 2012 poll commissioned by the Washington publication The Hill that revealed that nearly half, or 47%, of likely voters surveyed now believe it is impossible for them to become wealthy in the course of their lifetime.

Even more disturbing to an advocate of smart investing like me is the survey’s finding that fewer than two-in-five likely voters that year, or 37%, think they can ever become rich.

These findings certainly highlight the lack of confidence many Americans feel about their economic future, but the way I see it, you don’t have to buy into the pessimism.

rising stock market chart with piggy bank on jim woods way of the renaissance man

Getting rich and achieving success is possible, but in order to get rich and stay rich, you need to emulate the investing behavior of the rich.

And what do the rich do to get and stay rich? The answer is actually quite simple—they invest in stocks.

According to a June 2012 article at CNBC.com, “Why the Rich Recovered and the Rest Didn’t,” the reason why the wealthy have managed to recover from the ravages of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression is because they have a greater proportion of their wealth in stocks, and less of their overall net worth in their homes.

The article points out that according to the latest data from the Federal Reserve, the wealth of the middle class declined by more than a third between 2007 and 2010, but the wealth of the top 10% actually grew by 2%.

Yes, this is a case of the rich getting richer, but how did they get that way?

According to Fed data from 2009, the top 1% of income earners had just 10% of their overall wealth attributed to real estate. This group had much more of its wealth, or 38%, in financial investments, including 9% of their wealth in stocks.

By comparison, the Fed data showed that both middle class and upper-middle class, i.e., those in the 50% to 90% range, counted more than half of their wealth in their homes. This group only had one third of their wealth in financial investments, and perhaps most revealing, they only had 1.6% of their wealth in stocks.

The initial conclusion you may draw here is that the reason why the rich have more money to invest in stocks is simply because they have more money. Yet looking at things through this simplified lens obscures the deeper image to be gleaned from the data.

The real insight here is that if you want to be rich, and if you want to stay rich, you simply must invest in stocks.Luxury pool at a tourist resort on way of the renaissance man

Now, there are many ways to invest in stocks, and there are myriad services and people out there to help you do just that. Yet even before you start investing with the help of any person or advisory service, the first step is realizing that to get rich, stay rich, or get even richer, you need to invest in stocks.

No other asset class can give you the kind of upside appreciation, liquidity and flexibility that stocks offer—and no other asset class can help you get where you want to be.

So, let me repeat: if you want to be rich, do as the rich do—and get invested in stocks.

In the name of the best within us,

Jim Woods

 

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What You Can Learn at 168 MPH

By Jim Woods

Some people play golf. Some people play tennis.

And while I certainly understand the appeal of these great activities, I prefer to engage in recreational activities that are, shall we say, a little more extreme.

Another way to describe my proclivities is the way many of my friends and family do, and that is to just say that, “Well, Jim’s just a little bit crazy.”

Now, I know what my friends and family mean when they say I’m a little crazy. And I know that they don’t mean that in the clinical sense. What they do mean is that the recreational activities I engage in are usually relatively high-risk, and often come with an intensity factor that’s a little bit high on the extreme scale.

Tactical marksmanship, Brazilian jiu-jitsu and high-intensity training to build muscular size and strength are some of these activities. Yet there are even more extreme arrows in my recreational quiver.

I bring this up, because some of the greatest insights I’ve gleaned about myself, including insights on risk taking, risk management — even the meaning of life itself — have come to me while engaged in extreme pursuits.

Moreover, these insights have helped me become a more skillful writer, entrepreneur, investor… and just a more well-rounded Renaissance Man.

Perhaps most importantly, I suspect some of these insights can help you do the same.

For many years, I was really into motorcycles, and not just riding motorcycles around on the weekends exploring the country. My motorcycle pursuits involved sport bikes and, in particular, road racing bikes. These are the bikes that go really, really fast, and the bikes that require you to lean off of them and drag your knee on the ground to go really fast around turns.

In other words, they are the kind of motorcycles that can get you into a lot of trouble, if you don’t know what you’re doing.

So, when I decided to buy my first road racing bike in the mid-2000s, I didn’t just go to the dealership, jump on the prettiest model and ride off the lot with abandon. Instead, I did my research on what was the best model of road race bike for riders just getting into the sport.

Then, I researched which training facilities were considered the most effective, and the ones that stressed safety first. I also made sure I researched the right safety equipment, including which brands offered the best protection in the event of the inevitable crash.

It was only after doing this due diligence on what the sport requires to be able to excel, stay relatively safe and really enjoy the experience that I actually embarked on the motorcycle road race journey.

It is this kind of thorough due diligence that I bring to the rest of my personal life, and to my professional life as an investment newsletter writer.

Yet, aside from the lesson of proper due diligence, I think the real lessons one learns in life are those garnered under heavy stress. You see, it’s the presence of stress — literally life-threatening stress — that teaches us a lot about ourselves, our resolve and our ability to focus our minds on a singular task.

That’s the lesson I learned after participating in several motorcycle road racing “track days.” This is where you go out with a group of riders of similar experience and try to do your best lap times around a professional race track.

The track where I really learned a lot was the Auto Club Speedway in Southern California. This track has one of the longest straightaways in road racing, and experienced riders regularly reach speeds north of 170 mph.

After several “timid” laps around the track reaching top speeds of 130, then 140 and then 150 mph, I finally felt comfortable enough to open up my machine to see what she could really do. Yet this decision came toward the end of the day, and my brakes weren’t working as well as they had been early in the session.

I found this out quickly, as I spun up the engine on the Honda CBR 1000, hitting an exhilarating 168 mph on the front straight before applying the front brake — only to find that I was getting little response.

Moreover, as I looked ahead, there was a pack of riders in front of me who were slowing down for the next turn, a task I should have already done seconds before. I decided there was only a couple of things I could do. I could apply both the front and rear brakes as hard as I could, hoping the bike would slow enough for me to pull off the racing line, or I could dump the bike while going about 160 mph and risk severe injury (but still managing to avoid my fellow riders).

My decision had to be split second, and as you can imagine, it was under extreme duress. I opted to trust my equipment, and my training, by pumping the lever that controls the front brake, downshifting into a lower gear to slow the bike down and gently but steadily applying the rear brake to help slow the bike and steady the chassis. The maneuver worked, and I was able to guide the bike — and myself — back into pit lane safely.

That day, I learned to A) Trust my equipment, B) Trust my training and C) Trust my judgement under stress.

If I had panicked and opted to get off the bike, the consequences could have been disastrous.

So, the next time you’re faced with a situation where a potential calamity quickly approaches, trust your due diligence, trust your training (i.e. your accumulated knowledge) and, above all, trust your judgment and wisdom.

It is the knowledge of self and confidence in your own decisions that will carry you through times of acute stress.

Whether that stress is manufactured by your “crazy” choice to ride a motorcycle really, really fast, or whether that stress is created by an investment you’ve made in the equity markets, or in a business, or anywhere in your personal life, what will get you through is a clear mind, good preparation… and trust in your good judgment.

In the name of the best within us,

Jim Woods

 

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5 Favorite Renaissance Man Quotes to Live By

By Jim Woods

When it comes to the wisdom we all need to get us through life, and to help us navigate its inevitable turbulent emotional swings, sometimes all we need is the power of a great quote.

As a Renaissance Man, I’m a big fan of finding wisdom about life from all sorts of disparate sources. That wisdom could come from literature, or from song lyrics, or from sports figures.

Yet wherever it comes from, the wisdom we can gather from others can help keep us high during the best of times… and help us keep our heads high during the worst of times.

Here are five of my favorite quotes that apply to both life—and investing.

“Every man’s life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another.”

—Ernest Hemingway

One of my favorite writers, Ernest Hemingway, knew how to live life on the intense edge. Here, the pugnacious novelist reminds us that all that really matters in life is how you spend your days.

When it comes to investing, like Hemingway, you need to be aggressive and intense, as really good results come to those who embrace the action.

Hemingway Woods - The Ultimate Renaissance Man canine
“Hemingway” also is the name of the resident Renaissance Man canine.

“I was blessed with talent, but I worked like I had none.”

—Kobe Bryant

The Los Angeles Laker great always worked harder than just about any of his competitors. Could Kobe have coasted on his innate talent and still done well? Probably. However, it was his attitude and work ethic that set him apart from the rest, and that made him one of the greatest players of all time.

Whatever you do in life, if you adopt the work ethic and attitude of Kobe Bryant, you are likely going to do very well.

If I took the time to bleed from
All the tiny little arrows shot my way,
I wouldn’t be here!

—Rollins Band, “Shine”

In-your-face punk rocker Henry Rollins is a personal hero of mine, as his focused lyrics and penetrating ideas on cultivating strength of will are indeed inspirational.

Here, Rollins reminds us that you are always going to be criticized by others for what you do. And, so what?

Do what you think is best, and ignore the haters, as they’ll always want to shoot arrows your way.

From first to last
The peak is never passed
Something always fires the light
That gets in your eyes

—RUSH, “Marathon”

The quintessential progressive rock trio has the best lyrics in all of rock music. In this song, RUSH tells us that no matter how much you achieve, you can always challenge yourself and achieve more.

This is a great lesson for a Renaissance Man, because no matter how well you do, you can always be a little smarter, a little savvier and a little more fulfilled.

“The quickest descent into unhappiness is to constantly compare yourself to others.”

—Jim Woods

This final one is my own, and it’s helped me keep my restless mind in check on countless occasions.

While it’s natural to gauge your success in life by the success or lack thereof in others, you will drive yourself crazy if you obsess over what others have, or how others are living or what others have achieved.

To be truly happy, you need to be happy with your own striving for success, and for your own victories. In fact, the only person you should compare yourself with is you.

Strive to be better than you were the previous day. If you can achieve that, you’ll be on the path toward happiness—and you’ll be looking through the lens of life like a Renaissance Man.

In the name of the best within us,

Jim Woods

 

Now, we want to hear from you! Would like to share your opinion or make a comment on the Way of the Renaissance Man podcast? If so, then please leave your comment or questions in the space provided below and share this article with your friends and family on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Your comments or question could be chosen as our featured
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A Renaissance Man Needs to Be the Lead Mare

By Jim Woods

I’m a horseman, and I own several horses and a small ranch in Southern California.

I love these intelligent animals, and I take pride in learning about myself from one of the best teachers on earth — the horse.

You see, the horse is a herd animal, and one that has evolved to thrive in a group social structure. The horse also is an animal that requires leadership, as the highest-ranking mares (and sometimes the stallions) in the herd are the leaders, directing the movement of the group to different grazing areas or water sources.

In “natural horsemanship” of the kind I practice, the horseman is tasked with taking the “lead mare” role. In doing so, the horseman must provide the leadership to his/her beloved animals that they require to survive and flourish.

This method works well, provided the horseman has the requisite confidence in his/her knowledge and skills, and provided he/she has accepted the responsibility of assuming the lead mare role.

Confidence here is perhaps the most important ingredient, but confidence only comes after you’ve done the hard work to acquire the knowledge and skill necessary to assume that confident lead-mare swagger.

And regarding that swagger, have you ever noticed that truly confident people nearly always walk with their heads up?

Think about that for a moment. Have you ever known a confident person that’s always looking down?

The answer is almost certainly no, and the reason why is because confident people don’t look down. They look up, and they take on life as the lead mare.

That lead mare role is one that I assume not only with my horses, but also with my other hobbies, and particularly my professional role as an investment newsletter writer.

In fact, during my more than two decades in the investment advisory industry, I have worked extremely hard to build up the requisite knowledge and skill needed to be the lead mare when it comes to helping investors grow and protect their money. That’s because hard work and concerted, rational effort is at the heart of becoming a Renaissance Man.

That’s why you’ll always get the sense from me through my writing and my speaking events, and if you ever meet me in person, that I am the type of man who never looks down when I walk. I’m also the kind of man who relishes the lead mare role.

If you want to be a Renaissance Man, then be confident, never look down when you walk… and never be afraid to lead.

In the name of the best within us,

Jim Woods

 

Now, we want to hear from you! Would like to share your opinion or make a comment on the Way of the Renaissance Man podcast? If so, then please leave your comment or questions in the space provided below and share this article with your friends and family on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Your comments or question could be chosen as our featured Ask the Renaissance Man Anything on a future episode.